The will of Theodore Becon (abt. 1556 – 1619/20)

Theodore is a 10 x great uncle of mine

(this is a transcription of a photocopy of a will proved in the Archdeaconry Court of Canterbury, ref. PRC 17/60/133 – the register copy of Theodore’s will; for a register copy it is unusually difficult to read. I will look for PRC16/167 B/3 – the original will, though now I have got used to old handwriting I have managed to decipher pretty well all of the register copy)

In the name of God Amen I
Theodore Beacon Doctor in Phisicke of the
parishe of [St Mary] Magdalen in the Citye
of Canterburye knowing that its ordeyned
for all men once to dye and nothinge more uncertayne
then the hower of death expectinge howerlye
the tyme of my dissolacon wherein I shalbe
traslated owt of this vale of miserye to raigne
with my most happye Saviour, in his most
glorious kingdome beinge in good heath of
bodye, and like disposition of mynd Christe
Jesus be thanked for yt, I doe ordeyne my
laste will and testament in manner and forme
followeinge, Firste I bequeath my soule
into the hands of my most mercifull Father
wth a full assurance of the salvation thereof
by his mercye and Christs onlye merritts
alsoe I doe bequeath my bodye unto the
earth from whence it came assuringe my
selfe that at the laste daye I shalbe clothed
agayne wth my fleshe; that I shall see
god wth these eyes, and that I shall both in
bodye, and sowle, possesse that heavenlye
joyes wch god the Father through Christe
Christe hath prepared for all them that love
him, In hope of wch happines, and glorye,
I will this my bodye to be Decentlye buryed
in the bodye of Christe his Church in Can:
:terburye, Now concerninge these temp[or]all
blessings wherewth god hath inritched me
farrabove my deserts as I found them in
?? [looks like a couple of words hidden by crease in paper] willinglye leawe them to
them I love, and leawe in this [some words hidden by crease in paper]
First I bequeath unto my eldest daughter
Elizabeth Beacon two hundred and fyftye
pounds of Currant Englishe money to be
payd her within one yeare after my decease
and in the meane tyme to have the
profytt arysinge thereof for her
mayntennance, Item I give unto Sibbell
Beacon my youngest daughter two hundred
and fyftye pounds of like Curant Englishe
money to be paid her wthin one whole
yeare after my decease in the meane
tyme that she  shall have the profytts
thereof arysinge for her mayntenn[an]ce
Item I give unto these my two daughters
the residue of all my household stuffe, and
plate to be equally devided betwixt
them by my executor Item I give unto
my brother Basill Beacon twentye
[sheet 2]
shillings to  make him a Ringe with our arms engraved
uppon yt[1Item I give unto St Johns College
in Cambridge a Colledge pott[2] weiyoinge sixteene
ounces of silver uppon the one set there so
I will have my armes engraven wth these words
followeing Theodorus Beaconus in medicinis
doctor quondam socius hujis Collegii, dedit
quod debet quod potuit non quod voluit; Item
I give unto one hundreth religious poore of the
Cittye of Canterburye one hundreth shillings to be
Distributed by my executor and of this my laste
will and testament I ordayne my sonne Anthony
Beacon my sole Executor chardginge him as
will answere it at the dreadfull daye of judg:
=ment that these things maye be faythfullye
p[er]formed, and my debts truelye payd and my bodye
to be decentlye buryed accordinge to my Degree
Theo: Beacon Sealed published and deliv[er]ed
In the presence of us George Yonge[3] Edward
Knight.

Probatum fuit … primo die mensis Aprilis Anno Dni 1620 … [all in Latin]

[1] Note to be added re the Becon arms

[2Note to be added re the silver pot

[3] Witness ‘George Yonge’ was presumably the George Young who was not only the husband of Theodore’s niece, Rachel Becon, but also a fellow doctor in Canterbury.


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